Category: Database Hacking


Whether it is through manual poking and prodding or the use of security testing tools, malicious attackers employ a variety of tricks to break into SQL Server systems, both inside and outside your firewall. It stands to reason then, if the hackers are doing it, you need to carry the same attacks to test the security strength of your systems. Here are 10 hacker tricks to gain access and violate systems running SQL Server.

1. Direct connections via the Internet

These connections can be used to attach to SQL Servers sitting naked without firewall protection for the entire world to see (and access). DShield’s Port Report shows just how many systems are sitting out there waiting to be attacked. I don’t understand the logic behind making a critical server like this directly accessible from the Internet, but I still find this flaw in my assessments, and we all remember the effect the SQL Slammer worm had on so many vulnerable SQL Server systems. Nevertheless, these direct attacks can lead to denial of service, buffer overflows and more.

While the adoption of web applications for conducting online business has enabled companies to connect seamlessly with their customers, it has also exposed a number of security concerns stemming from improper coding. Vulnerabilities in web applications allow hackers to gain direct and public access to sensitive information (e.g. personal data, login credentials).

Web applications allow visitors to submit and retrieve data to/from a database over the Internet. Databases are the heart of most web applications. They hold data needed for web applications to deliver specific content to visitors and provide information to customers, suppliers etc.

SQL Injection is perhaps the most common web-application hacking technique which attempts to pass SQL commands through a web application for execution by the back-end database. The vulnerability is presented when user input is incorrectly sanitized and thereby executed.