Tag Archive: Vulnerability


This book is a practical guide to discovering and exploiting security flaws in web applications. The authors explain each category of vulnerability using real-world examples, screen shots and code extracts. The book is extremely practical in focus, and describes in detail the steps involved in detecting and exploiting each kind of security weakness found within a variety of applications such as online banking, e-commerce and other web applications.

The topics covered include bypassing login mechanisms, injecting code, exploiting logic flaws and compromising other users. Because every web application is different, attacking them entails bringing to bear various general principles, techniques and experience in an imaginative way. The most successful hackers go beyond this, and find ways to automate their bespoke attacks. This handbook describes a proven methodology that combines the virtues of human intelligence and computerized brute force, often with devastating results.

The authors are professional penetration testers who have been involved in web application security for nearly a decade. They have presented training courses at the Black Hat security conferences throughout the world. Under the alias “PortSwigger”, Dafydd developed the popular Burp Suite of web application hack tools.

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Whether it is through manual poking and prodding or the use of security testing tools, malicious attackers employ a variety of tricks to break into SQL Server systems, both inside and outside your firewall. It stands to reason then, if the hackers are doing it, you need to carry the same attacks to test the security strength of your systems. Here are 10 hacker tricks to gain access and violate systems running SQL Server.

1. Direct connections via the Internet

These connections can be used to attach to SQL Servers sitting naked without firewall protection for the entire world to see (and access). DShield’s Port Report shows just how many systems are sitting out there waiting to be attacked. I don’t understand the logic behind making a critical server like this directly accessible from the Internet, but I still find this flaw in my assessments, and we all remember the effect the SQL Slammer worm had on so many vulnerable SQL Server systems. Nevertheless, these direct attacks can lead to denial of service, buffer overflows and more.